ENG103: Additional Final Paper Topics

Two additional final paper topics have been submitted by your classmates and approved:

Issue 4: On Saturday, October 5, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a set of state bills addressing undocumented immigrants. A piece by NPR provides in-depth coverage, including an explanation of the political environment that spawned the legislation. More coverage is provided here by the Washington Post. Be sure to address the warrants behind both sides of the general immigration debate as well as the logistical, judicial, and political issues surrounding the California legislation, sometimes referred to by its key component, the “Trust Act.”

Issue 5: In 2011, the US Supreme Court ruled that video games are effectively “art” and are deserving of the same protections as other forms of art. The New York Times covers the issue here and the actual court opinion provides even more stimulation for the litigious. Again, be sure to address all relevant warrants including the First Amendment and public safety.

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ENG103: Final Paper Topics

For your final paper (8-10 pages) prepare a treatment of one of the issues below. In your work, be sure to fully research and document the issue, identify key arguments and counterarguments (as well as their warrants and backing), evaluate all evidence, and propose solutions (using the Rogerian method if applicable).

Issue 1: AB1266 (School Success and Opportunity Act) was designed to “ensure that California public schools understand their responsibility for the success and well-being of all students, including transgender students. It will allow transgender students to fully participate in all school activities like sports team and have access to facilities that match their gender identity” (ACLUNC). Opponents of the measure, however, claim that AB1266 is “an invasion of student privacy to open sensitive school facilities such as showers, restrooms and locker rooms to students of the opposite sex” (Privacy for All Students). The opponents of AB1266 have begun a referendum to prevent the California law from being enacted on January 1, 2014.

Issue 2: On November 6, 2013, the United States Supreme Court heard arguments over whether the “mostly Christian prayers” (New York Times) that begin some town meetings are constitutional.  The two women challenging the prayers assert the invocations are “often explicitly sectarian […] and town residents were forced to listen to them in order to participate in local government” (New York Times). While the First Amendment states that there is to be no government establishment of a religion, the town (Greece, NY) claims it’s always been done that way. The case, Town of Greece v. Galloway, is also addressed in a NYT editorial.

Issue 3: In November 2010, WikiLeaks, the information dissemination organization fronted by Julian Assange, made secret US State Department cables available. The State Department claimed that US security and personnel were jeopardized by the release of the cables; the US Justice Department has an ongoing investigation of Assange, who may be guilty of espionage (Washington Post). In May 2013, a NSA contractor, Edward Snowden, release classified details about the agency’s mass surveillance program (Washington Post). The US charged Snowden with espionage, but he fled to Russia, where he now lives as a fugitive. Views on the incidents are widely divergent (as shown by this piece) and pit the freedom of information against national security.

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ENG103: Link to Bandura Article

Albert Bandura’s article, “Toward a Psychology of Human Agency,” is linked here. As you read it, consider again that human behavior is a function of genetics, environment, and cognition. In this case, Bandura posits that agency (or acting upon intentions) is the essence of cognition.

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Pierce College ENG103 Toulmin Model Tutorial

Having trouble distinguishing a claim from a warrant? Backing from evidence? This comprehensive tutorial might help you better understand the British philosopher’s model. If you’re still confused, this brief tutorial provides a relatively easy method for identifying Toulmin’s components in a simple argument.

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Pierce College ENG103 Alan W. Watts Explained

Those of you who may be feeling like “flies caught in honey” while reading our auxiliary text, The Wisdom of Insecurity, might appreciate this summary of Watts’ philosophy–brought to you by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the creators of South Park.

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Pierce College ENG103 Mike Davis Essay Link

ENG103 students (Sections 0367 & 0576) – A link to Mike Davis’s essay, which is to be used for your second writing assignment, is here: http://la.indymedia.org/news/2007/10/208946.php

Please remember to bring your textbooks for this Thursday’s quiz.

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Welcome ENG101 Section 4973 (PACE) Students

If you’re reading this, you’ve managed to successfully complete one of the course tasks–navigating to my website. Below are a few updates:

1. Please be sure to enroll in your external activity, MyWritingLab, as soon as possible. You can purchase access either with a brochure available at the Pierce Bookstore or directly through the site with a credit card. If you have not purchased access as part of one of my prior courses, enroll using course code duffy88266. If you have access because you were enrolled in one of my ENG28 sections, use this course code: duffy87754. (It will let you continue without paying for access again.) In either case, once you are enrolled, take the Path Builder (diagnostic test) and then begin working on the two assigned modules: Essay Development and Research. The first step of each module is a skill test.

2. For tomorrow’s quiz, please be sure to review the information covered in the tabs above: History of Thought, History of English, and The Writing Process. Be sure to carefully study the notes on objectivity and subjectivity under History of Thought. (On Wednesday, we did not spend as much time on these as I would have liked.)

3. Not all of you may have received a copy of Montaigne’s essay, “That It Is Folly…” on Wednesday night. Here’s an online version if you didn’t.

4. You can retrieve the online essay about the film Dr. Strangelove here.

Let me know if you have any questions. Dig in–this course accelerates rapidly!

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