ENG28: Sample Writing Portfolio

Pasted below is a sample writing portfolio. Note that you portfolio will be double spaced and your topics may vary from those in the paragraph types below. DO NOT COPY-PASTE OR IN ANY OTHER WAY MERELY PARROT THESE EXAMPLES. WRITE FROM YOUR OWN EXPERIENCE USING THESE EXAMPLES ONLY AS STYLE GUIDES.

José Student 

ENG28

January 4, 2010

Weekly Learning Journal

January 4, 2010 – Today was the first day of class. The class was filled to capacity. Only about six students from the wait list were able to add. I was lucky to have already been on the roster because I enrolled in the class early. We read the syllabus and reviewed the course outline. Then Mr. Duffy answered our questions about the course. We need to buy an access card for MyWritingLab and complete some work in an online program. I sure hope that helps with my grammar! Mr. Duffy also discussed the origins of the English language. That helped explain why English words have so many different pronunciations and why there are so many synonyms and conflicting rules. I really liked the conversation about dialects and the different versions of English. After class I went to the bookstore and bought my books. Luckily, the total wasn’t much more than $60.

January 11, 2010 – I can’t believe it is 2010. It is strange to write that number. But at least this year is off to a good start. I am in my ENG28 class and I started reading the assigned novel last night. It is a little strange, but I’m going to stick with it. Today in class we went over the writing process. The mnemonic device PODRE can be used to remember the steps: Prewriting, Organizing, Drafting, Revising, Editing. I must remember to use each of these steps! Today after class, I am going to read another three chapters in the novel and log into MyWritingLab. We need to finish the diagnostic tests by the end of the week. I was hoping to see a movie Thursday night, but it looks like I’ll have to stay in and work on my writing.    

January 18, 2010 – …

 José Student 

ENG28

January 4, 2010

Descriptive Paragraph

                The desk is an old-fashioned Dutch school table. It stands three-and-a-half feet high, it is four feet long, and it is two-and-a-half feet deep. The desk is made of a hard wood, possibly oak or cherry. It is stained a medium reddish brown. The desk has four square cross-section legs that are braced at about four inches high along the back and two sides. There are also two small top drawers on either side of the front. Each drawer has a simple brass clamshell handle. The drawers are about a foot wide and three inches high. The drawers are the same depth as the desk:  two-and-a-half feet. There is a semi-circular cutout along the front top panel between the two drawers which permits someone to sit close to the desk. The desk has a very smooth, glossy finish. There are some natural imperfections like knots, but there are also some signs of wear like dents in the desk surface.

Note that a descriptive paragraph uses detailed, objective language and avoids both the writer’s personal references (“This is my desk.”) and subjectivity (“I like the desk.”)

 

José Student 

ENG28

January 4, 2010

Narrative Paragraph

                Back in 1995, some friends of mine living in Ojai sent me an invite to their daughter’s high school graduation. I quickly looked at the invitation, noted the weekend, and filed it away. When the time of the graduation came I bought a gift for Jesse, the young woman who was graduating, and set my alarm for 7:00 am that Saturday so that I could make the 90-minute drive north from Los Angeles in time for the 11:00 am ceremony. When I got to my friends’ house—which was where we were going to meet before the graduation—everyone was sitting around in bathrobes and pajamas. I was a bit stunned. Then Jesse asked, “Why weren’t you at my graduation yesterday?” The graduation had been held on Friday and I had assumed it was on Saturday. So I was exactly twenty-four hours late!

José Student 

ENG28

January 4, 2010

Illustrative Paragraph

                There are many types of friendship, but a true friendship that stands the test of time requires patience, sacrifice, and shared experiences. Friends must be patient with each other. Even though friends may be alike in many ways, they will be different in other ways. So if you are a fast eater, but your friend is a slow eater, you may have to wait for him or her to finish eating if you go out to a restaurant. You might also have to compromise on the air temperature or the music level if you and your friend go on a road trip. Friends must also sacrifice for each other. If you want to go to the Marilyn Manson concert, but your friend is having his or her birthday party at Chuck E. Cheese’s at the same time, you’re going to have to just suck it up and go to the party. If you make a lame excuse to get out of the birthday party, you’re really not a good friend. Besides, Marilyn Manson is pretty passé now. Lastly, friends rely on shared experiences to bond them together and give them things to talk about later in life. My friends and I still laugh about the time we decided to climb Mt. Washington at nine o’clock at night and luckily only made it one-quarter of the way up before camping. If we had gone any higher we might have frozen to death! Shared experiences like this, as well as patience and sacrifice, make friendships what they are. 

José Student

Regina Pupil

ENG28

January 4, 2010

Collaborative Persuasive Paragraph

                Sure—there are lots of new improvements to the Pierce campus lately! But we think that this money would be better spent on additional classes. Many of the recent improvements to the campus were sorely needed, yet we question whether an ornate 50,000 square foot new student services building is money well spent.  Pierce College will receive about $273 million from the Prop A/AA bond measures to continue its visionary campus plan. But we ask: What good is this infrastructure investment when each semester there are countless students unable to enroll in basic English and math courses? If the Los Angeles Community College District has the ability to secure funding for large construction projects, it should also have the ability to modestly expand the number of courses offered each semester. Or perhaps the District can find some way of diverting the construction money to operational budgets. That way will have both a better campus and accomplish our institutional mission—to offer low-cost basic skills instruction!

Note that both names appear at the top of the collaborative paper and “we” is used instead of “I.”

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